Posts filed under: ‘Reading Notes – PR 3330‘




Giving Speeches and Presentations

  1. Choice of words should try to electrify the audience instead of putting them to sleep. Tips to do so are: use personal pronouns, avoid jargon, use contractions, use bold words, avoid empty phrases, avoid modifiers, vary sentence length, and use questions.
  2. The SPEAK method is a way for the audience to receive  nonverbal communication from the speaker. Smile, Posture, Eye contact, Animation, Kinetics (motion).
  3. A speech should have one to three key messages. To improve a speech you could make it shorter, make it sharper, start it off strong, use stylistic devices, include rhetorical questions, use light touch of humor, respect wordsmithing, use greater variety in research, avoid using audiovisual aids as a crutch, and end strong.
  4. Speeches provide opportunities for additional publicity by inviting the press to cover it, preparing news releases, distributing audio and visual clips, converting the speech to op-ed piece, reprinting it in a brochure, and posting excerpts on a Web page.
  5. Audiovisuals dramatically increase the ability of audiences to retain and understand information. Powerpoint can create attractive slides in a variety of formats. Just have to be careful not to overdo it otherwise it will have a negative effect.  

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

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Reading Notes for Chapter 15

Add a comment April 26, 2010

Avoiding Legal Hassles

  1. Misappropriation of personality is also called trademark infringement. This is when there was no permission to use the article and the licensing fees were not paid. This is just telling you to be careful not to steal someone else’s work, photos or slogans unless you have obtained permission first.
  2. The protection of trademarks has three guidelines that must be followed: They are not allowed to be verbs, They must be proper adjectives, They have to be capitalized, They can not be plural, They must also be followed by a noun or phrase.
  3. The copyright law is the protection of creative work but does not protect against ideas. Copyrighted material needs to obtain permission before duplicating.
  4. Employees in companies encourage their workers to have a blog but they have to follow special guidelines. This is a good way to obtain information and get involved in discussions. The blogs are not allowed to talk about other workers within the company. This leads to lawsuits and invasion of others privacy.
  5. A freelance writer, photographer, or artist owns their own work. Unless a contract has been negotiated a company cannot use or publish it. When the work is used by the company it then is called work for hire.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 3

Add a comment April 26, 2010

Becoming a Persuasive Writer

  1. Persuasive writing should not be misleading or manipulative. The information should be the truth and not include anything that the writer does not believe themselves.
  2. Abraham H. Manslow’s hierarchy-of-needs theory list goes from our basic survival to our more complex needs. The needs from smallest to largest are: Physiological, Safety, Social, Ego, Self-actualization.
  3. Most of Public Relations writers spend their day creating messages that will persuade and motivate the people.
  4. Advertising and Public Relations messages sometimes use Propaganda in their work. A few common ways are by Testimonials, Bandwagon,and Card stacking.
  5. There are two types of audiences called the Passive and Active. Passive audiences is also known as the Inactive public and have little knowledge or involvement in the specific subject. Active audiences are the opposite and have an understanding of the subject matter but want to gain more knowledge about it.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 2

Add a comment April 26, 2010

Writing E-mail, Memos, and Proposals

  1. E-mail reduces the cost of employee communications, increases the distribution of messages to more employees, flattens the corporate hierarchy and speeds up decision-making. It is primarily an informal memo system.
  2. Memorandums or memo is a brief written message which is usually a page or less in length. It is distributed to employees through the organization’s mail system. Today most memo’s are sent through e-mail.
  3. Letters are a more official or formal approach to writing. There can be two kinds of letters: single personal letter to a specific individual and the second kind of letter is less personal and often about a specific situation which is sent to a large number of readers.
  4. Proposals usually include: background and capabilities of the firm, client’s situation, goals and objectives of the proposed program, key messages, basic strategies and tactics, general timeline of activities, proposed budget, how success will be measured, a description of the team that will handle the account and a summary of why the firm should be selected to implement the program.
  5. A position paper, or “white paper” gives the organization’s perspective on a particular trend or industry. These should always begin with an “executive summary” or an overview, so people can read the highlights in a few seconds.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 14

Add a comment April 19, 2010

Producing Newsletters and Brochures

  1. Newsletters are the messages from an organization to various publics who want news and information. Professional groups use newsletters to inform members of upcoming meetings and events. Nonprofit organizations use newsletters to send prospective contributors information and recognize the efforts of the volunteers.
  2. Most periodicals have a layout that is somewhat standardized and has the same look and feel which is called a template. This always begins with the masthead or name of the publication which is always in the same font.
  3. Online newsletters or e-zines are supplemented with print publications. The e-zines have an advantage of instant information. the advantages of this is that it is only one click away, cost-effective and efficient.
  4. Annual reports are the most expensive and time-consuming publication prepared by an organization. These can also be used as a marketing tool to build stockholder loyalty, attract new investors, recruit employees, recognize current employees and even increase their consumer base.
  5. Desktop publishing software enables you to: draw an illustration and then reduce or enlarge it, use different type fonts and sizes, vary column widths, shade or screen backgrounds, add borders around copy, import graphics and photos and print out camera-ready pages that can be photocopied or printed on an offset press.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 13

Add a comment April 19, 2010

Tapping the Web and New Media

  1. Media traditionally had the characteristics of: it being centralized with a top-down hierarchy, costs a lot of money to become a publisher, staffed by professional gatekeepers known as editors and it features mostly one way communication with limited feedback channels. The new media is characterized by: widespread broadband, cheap/free and easy-to-use online publishing tools, new distribution channels, mobile devices, and new advertising paradigms.
  2. Advice for writing for the web include: define the objective if the site, design the site with the audience in mind, redesign existing material with strong graphic components instead of  just using existing material, update the site constantly, don’t overdo the graphics because complex graphics take a long time to download, make the site interactive, and use feedback to further evolve the site.
  3. Return on investment (ROI) is a good way to calculate and convince management that a website is well worth the investment and contributes to the “bottom line.”
  4. Real Simple Syndication (RSS) is a way to manage the vast amount of information available on the internet. RSS feeds include the headline, a short description of the article, and the link to the article.
  5. Weblogs have now abbreviated the term to blog. The essentials to blogging is to blog everyday, think about your topic and the audience your trying to reach, keep entries short, be sure to check spelling and grammar because they do count, use a lot of links to other stories and websites which will bring traffic to our page, and list your blog on sites to help readers find you.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 12

Add a comment April 18, 2010

Getting Along with Journalists

  1. Surveys show that media relations is the number one job responsibility of public relations staff as well as number one activity performed by corporate public relations departments.
  2. Two-thirds of journalists do not trust public relations people but 81 percent say that they need them anyway.
  3. The relationship between public relations and the media is based on mutual cooperation, trust, and respect but there is also aspects that compromise their relationship. Public relations side involves excessive use of hype, not doing the necessary homework, and making a nuisance of themselves. On the journalistic side, the actions include name calling, sloppy/biased reporting, and tabloid sensationalism.
  4. A news conference is a setting where many reporters ask questions. Two major reasons for having this is to give all media an opportunity to hear the announcement at the same time and to provide a setting where reporters can ask follow-up questions.
  5. There are important aspects involved to ensure there is media etiquette. A reporter should not be taken to lunch unless the purpose is to discuss a possible story or to give background briefing on an upcoming event. Another thing that is important is that a reporter should not receive gifts. It is alright if it is something small with nominal value but not wise to give expensive gifts of more than $25.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 11

Add a comment April 18, 2010

Distributing News to the Media

  1. Media databases can vary in their format or scope but usually always provide essential information as the names of publications and broadcast stations, mailing addresses, telephone and fax numbers, e-mail addresses and the names of key editors and reporters.
  2. Trade publications and business periodicals tend to operate on what is known as an editorial calendar. This is when certain issues have a specific focus. This is also a way to attract advertising.
  3. Tip sheets are weekly newsletters that report on recent changes in news personnel and their new assignments, how to contact them, and what kinds of material they are looking for. This allows you to use the rifle approach and increase the odds on getting media placement.
  4. Most distribution of material is in electronic or digital formats. The primary channels are: e-mail, online newsroom, electronic newswires, mat distribution companies, and photo placement firms.
  5. Keywords are important for search engine optimization (SEO) and these keywords have to be the same keywords that consumers would likely use to search information.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 10

Add a comment April 18, 2010

Writing for Radio and Television

  1. Radio is a cost-effective way to reach large numbers of people. It reaches about 225 million adults on a daily basis while  television reaches 150 million viewers on a daily basis.
  2. Tips for successful radio and television story placements are:  topicality, timeliness, localization, humanization, and visual appeal.
  3. A public service announcement can be 10, 15, 20, 30, or 60 seconds long and most of these air after midnight. The best time to get PSA’s aired is in January while the worst timing is the few months leading to Christmas.
  4. Product placements or plugs, are negotiated by product publicists. These have become a major part of the television and film industry. Issue placement is an extension to this and is when programs write an issue into the scripts.
  5. Organizations and groups can get exposure by making community calendars, radio promotions, creative publicity ideas, and documentaries.

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 9

Add a comment April 18, 2010

Selecting Publicity Photos and Graphics

  1. The main components of a good photo are: technical quality, subject matter, composition, action, scale, camera angle, lighting, timing and color.
  2. When writing a photo caption you should never begin with “In the photo above …” or “This is a picture of …” instead you should write in an interesting way that sounds interesting to the reader. When explaining the photo, you should explain from the left to the right.
  3. Photographs add appeal to increase media usage of news releases or features. Although you should never send an attachment to an editor or reporter unless required to do so.
  4. Photographs are not the only art form that you can use for publicity purposes. Charts, maps, diagrams, line drawings and clip art also as widely used.
  5. It will cost more money to use a professional photographer but you will end up with great workable pictures. You have to be careful with retouching a photo that it does not change the photo too much and turn it into a completely different photograph.

 

Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques 6th Edition – Dennis L. Wilcox

 Link to Book

Reading Notes for Chapter 8

Add a comment April 14, 2010

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